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PROFESSIONAL CARE FOR PRECIOUS PAWS

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Puppy & Kitten Care

Congratulations on the arrival of your lovely new pup or kitten. Whether this is your first puppy or kitten, or the latest in a long line you will hopefully find some of this information useful.

Puppy care

  • Diet

    We recommend feeding your new pup puppy food 4 times daily until 12weeks of age, then 3 times daily until 6months then either once or twice daily after that. Generally it is probably better to feed dogs twice daily, especially if your dog is a bigger breed. Progress onto junior diets at the age recommended by the manufacturer and do the same when your pup becomes adult.
    In some individuals products containing milk can cause diarrhoea so avoid them if this happens.
  • Vaccinations

    We recommend vaccinating your puppy at 8 and 12 weeks of age (although we can give the first vaccination at 6-8 weeks old with a second dose at 10 weeks old if required).
    Your puppy will be fully covered 2wks after the 2nd vaccination. We recommend you avoid walking your pup in places where there will be dogs with unknown vaccination histories (places like busy parks, busy roads etc.), until after this time. Because of the risk of rats spreading leptospirosis in urine you should also avoid ponds and river banks for the same period.
     

    VACCINATIONS

  • Insurance

    We recommend that you consider pet insurance for your new puppy and it is ideal to take out insurance as soon as you get him/her home. If your puppy is unwell the last thing you want to worry about is how to pay for treatment.
    We can provide a free months cover to get you started.

    INSURANCE

  • Worming

    We recommend that you worm your pup monthly until they are 6 months old then every 3months after that for routine worm control.
    HOWEVER we are in a high lungworm incidence area. Lungworm is spread by slugs and snails which your puppy can swallow when playing with them or even when eating grass. Therefore we recommend using a monthly treatment that protects against lungworm as well as routine worms. Many of the standard wormers are not effective against lungworm.
    Lungworm can cause lung problems, but also can affect the brain, causing fits and other neurological problems, and also affect blood clotting.
    Tapeworms are not such a big problem in this area. Dogs become infected by eating raw meat or by ingesting fleas so they are more likely to be seen in dogs that hunt, eat raw food, or have fleas. Tape worms are more of a risk in other areas so if you travel abroad or to Wales or Scotland with your dog you should treat for tapeworms.
     

    WORMING

  • Fleas

    There are a variety of flea products available and most of these should be applied monthly and we can advise you on which to use. If you have an outbreak of fleas you may like to use a household product to treat house.

    FLEAS

  • Ticks

    There are a number of tick treatments available, many of which are combined with flea treatments. Please ask for advice on which product is most suitable for your pup.

    TICKS

  • Socialisation

    Socialisation is very important for your new puppy. There is a socialisation “window” which lasts up to about 16wks old but the first 12weeks are particularly important. During this period your pup is much more able to get used to all of the things he is going to meet in life including other dogs, traffic and people. Pups shouldn’t mix with unvaccinated dogs until two weeks after the second vaccination but there are advantages in socialising as early as you are able. Care must be taken not to expose your pup to unnecessary risks and the small risk of infections must be balanced against the risk of ending up with a dog that has behavioural problems.  Taking this into account you may choose to introduce your pup to friendly fully vaccinated dogs who haven’t been to very public places (kennels, shows etc.) at an early stage.
    We recommend puppy classes for socialisation as well as training. Many classes accept pups after they have had their first injection.  We welcome you to attend our free puppy parties which will introduce pups to other puppies, and give you advice on training, behaviour, diet, worming etc. The puppies enjoy it and often pups that have been to our puppy classes will be excited by a trip to the vets for the rest of their lives! Click here to view details of our Puppy Parties.
    During this socialisation window you should try to introduce your pup to lots of different situations such as the vets (attend our puppy classes!), travel in cars, traffic (carry in arms if necessary if not fully vaccinated, or walk them on quiet roads where the risk of meeting unvaccinated dogs is low), different people, cats, children, people in hats, umbrellas etc. Make all of these interactions pleasurable through using lots of praise and treats.
    We encourage you to bring your pup into us for a free health check with a nurse at  6 months old, and at other times for example to  get weighed (and have a treat!), so that your pup associates going to the vets with pleasant experiences.
  • Biting & Chewing

    All pups will bite with their needle sharp teeth! It’s important they learn about “bite inhibition”
    We recommend that when a pup bites or nips anyone, that person should give a short sharp yip/yelp and ignore the pup for 20 seconds or so. After this time they can go back the pup, giving the pup fuss and praising him/her when it’s not biting. The pup can also be handed an appropriate toy that it can chew on instead of the human! If the pup keeps biting after you go back to it, then a short time out is sensible.
    All pups will chew so make sure that your pup has access to appropriate toys to chew on. Check these toys regularly for damage, and make sure anything that you don’t want to be chewed is out of reach.
  • House Training

    Allow lots of opportunity for your pup to be successful by letting him out often, especially after meals and when he wakes up. Look for tell-tale sniffing around as sign they want to go out. Use a specific word or phrase when they start to sniff around outside and you can use this later if you need to encourage your dog to go at a particular time.
    Give lots of praise when they are successful.
  • Training

    We recommend using a reputable training school where the trainer is registered with the ABPT and training is reward based training, rather than punishment based.
  • Microchipping

    It will be compulsory from April 2016 for all dogs to be microchipped by 8weeks of age.
    We can implant a microchip at any age during a normal appointment.

    MICROCHIPPING

  • Neutering

    We recommend females dogs should be neutered at 6 months of age, or 2-4 months after a season.  The ideal time is at 6 months old because this dramatically decreases the risk of mammary tumours in later life and also means that there is no risk of pregnancy during the first season.

    NEUTERING

Kitten care

  • Vaccinations

    We recommend vaccination against Cat Flu, Feline Enteritis and Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) when your kitten is 8-9 weeks old with a second dose at 12 weeks old. Full immunity develops 2 weeks after the second vaccination so your kitten should certainly be kept indoors until then. Many owners, however, will want to keep their kitten in until they are 6 months old so that they can be neutered first and will be less vulnerable when they first venture out.

    VACCINATIONS

  • Diet

    We recommend you feed kitten food to start with, 3-4 times daily, reducing gradually to two meals a day at 6 months old. It is common to feed dry food ad lib to cats which is fine to do as many cats won’t eat more than they need. There are some cats, however, that will over eat so they may require you to offer a measured quantity of food each day. You should progress onto adult food at the age recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Insurance

    We recommend that you consider pet insurance for your new kitten and it is ideal to take out insurance as soon as you get him home. If your kitten is unwell the last thing you want to worry about is how to pay for treatment.
    We can provide a free months cover to get you started.

    INSURANCE

  • Worming

    We recommend that you worm your kitten every month until they are 6 months old and then at least every 3 months after that. Round and tapeworm treatment is recommended.
    Remember tapeworms are often spread via fleas so if seen your cat needs to be treated against fleas too.

    WORMING

  • Fleas

    There are a variety of flea products available, most of which should be applied monthly. We can advise you on which to use. If you have an outbreak of fleas it may be helpful to use a household product to treat your house as well.

    FLEAS

  • Ticks

    There are a number of tick treatments available, many of which are combined with flea treatments. Please ask for advice on which is the best for your kitten.

    TICKS

  • Socialisation

    Most of the socialisation “window” will have been at the breeders home, however it is important to continue socialisation of your kitten at home. We recommend getting your kitten used to as many different experiences as possible and make sure that they are pleasurable so that your kitten does not become nervous.
    Try and handle your kitten (by touching them all over and gently picking them up), for up to an hour a day, to get them used to being handled. Try and get your kitten used to being handled by at least four different people at this stage.
    Discourage games that involve chasing fingers etc. as this may escalate when older.
  • Toilet Training

    Make sure your kitten’s litter tray is in a quiet part of the house and away from food and water bowls
  • Microchipping

    We recommend every cat is microchipped as even an indoor cat can escape
    This can be done at vaccination or neutering or any other time that is convenient but should be done before your kitten starts going out.

    MICROCHIPPING

  • Neutering

    Both male and female cats can be neutered from 4 months old. It is important to neuter females by 5 and ½ months old if you want to avoid them getting pregnant.

    NEUTERING

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Information:
Contact Details:
Long Lane
Bursledon
Southampton
Hampshire
SO31 8DA
Tel 023 8040 6215
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